Juyuanhao Bow&Arrow workshop

October 20th, 2011 No comments

Chinese traditional archery which for ancient Chinese Imperial Military
Juyuanhao videos from Discovery (Approximate 7 Minutes):

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From the year of 1720 – today.

The Ju Yuan Hao bow and arrow-making workshop used to be one of the 17 Imperial bow and arrow-making workshops in the gong jian da yuan (bow & arrow courtyard), located on Dongsi Street. This workshop is the only bow and arrow-making workshop that retains its bow and arrow-making tradition.

The Ju Yuan Hao bow is one kind of “recurve” Chinese traditional bow, which has a curvature when it is unstrung. Craftsmen first make a core for the bow from thin bamboo and attach the wooden grip and the ears. Then they firmly glue horn and sinew to the core. Finally craftsmen decorate the bow with material such as birch bark, symbols, and lacquer.

The traditional bow and arrow have struggled mightily in the market since the 1960s. In order to continue keep this technical tradition alive, the owner of the Ju Yuan Hao workshop, Yang Wentong, passed on his skills to his third son, Yang Fuxi.

Now, Mr. Yang Fuxi (Master of Ju Yuan Hao Workshop) is the only one who can make the Chinese traditional bow and arrows. Juyuanhao Workshop, today’s only one who can make Chinese traditional archery which were used by ancient Chinese Imperial Military.
Features of Juyuanhao bow and arrows: Light,Durable,Immensely Accurate and Powerful.
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CHENG Ming won the recurve women’s World Cup Final 2011

October 7th, 2011 No comments
The 25-year old Chinese archer CHENG Ming won the recurve women’s World Cup Final 2011 in Istanbul, Turkey. Since she started competing on the World Cup circuit in 2010, she has won eight medals (individual, team and mixed team altogether) in stages, including three gold, two silver and three bronze. The Chinese is ranked 7th in the world.
 
CHENG did not qualify in the Chinese team for this year’s World Championships that took place in July in Turin, Italy. But she overcame disappointment and won her first World Cup stage in individual in August in Ogden. It was her victory in the USA that assured her of a spot for the Istanbul Final where won the title.
In 2010, she won two gold medals, in team and mixed team, at Stage 2 in Antalya, Turkey. The same year, she was also individual and team silver medallist at the Asian Games.
In the first week of October 2011, CHENG shot in the Olympic Test Event in London, where she was 18th after the ranking round. Seeded No. 3 in the team event, CHENG and her teammates FANG Yuting and XU Jing defeated Poland in quarterfinals and the host country Great Britain in semifinals. The Chinese then lost the gold medal match to the favourite No. 1 team Korea and clinched silver in London.
In the individual event in London, the World Cup champion was happy to come out the winner in her first match against Sinead CUTHBERT (IRL), 6-4, despite shooting 24 points only in the fifth set. However, luck went over to the other side in 1/16 elimination, where CHENG was defeated by Ksenia PEROVA (RUS) after a shoot-off.
Biography Extract:
CHENG Ming (CN) – Born 11 February 1986
1st
Individual
World Cup Final Istanbul
2011
1st
Individual
World Cup Stage 3 Ogden
2011
3rd
Team
World Cup Stage 3 Ogden
2011
2nd
Individual
Asian Games Guangzhou
2010
2nd
Team
Asian Games Guangzhou
2010
2nd
Team
World Cup Stage 4 Shanghai
2010
3rd
Team
World Cup Stage 3 Ogden
2010
1st
Team
World Cup Stage 2 Antalya
2010
1st
Mixed Team
World Cup Stage 2 Antalya
2010
3rd
Team
World Cup Stage 1 Porec
2010
2nd
Mixed Team
World Cup Stage 1 Porec
2010


Source: World Archery Communication

China wins silver in women’s archery team event

November 21st, 2010 No comments

China wins silver in women’s archery team event in Guangzhou 16th Asian Games on Nov 21, 2010.

GUANGZHOU – The gold medal winning Korean women’s archery team used the daunting experience of handling snakes as part of its training methods.

Team coach Cho Eun-sin was surprised when news slipped out about the practice after her team won its fourth consecutive Asian Games gold medal in the women’s team event at the Aoti archery range on Sunday. China took the silver and India the bronze.

“I wonder how did you find out the secret of our success,” said Cho when asked about the team’s strange training ritual.

“Actually, (the story) is about 80 percent true. We do have special training to enhance bravery.”

It seems the scary, scaly initiative worked. Locked in a battle royal with the young Chinese archers, the three experienced Koreans held their nerve in a second extra period to shoot three 10-point scores.

“They had the ability to reach that level,” said Cho. “They got nervous when the scores were tied, but I tried to let them relax and be themselves. In the tiebreak we said this was our chance to win. We did our best and our efforts paid off.”

Korea is not the only team to adopt a strange approach to boosting the fortitude of its athletes.

To prepare for the Asian Games, Chinese archers were required to touch a tiger’s rear at the zoo.

“We paid attention to controlling our emotions. We can shoot as well as them (the Koreans), but the win came down to who played better under pressure,” said Chinese archer Cheng Ming.

China’s coach, Tian Yulin, said: “The most important thing for the team was to gain hands-on experience, and this was the best training they could get.

“It was their first time in such a tense international competition and they won a silver,” said Tian. “There’s a gap between Korea and China, but it is very slim. It’s just a matter of time before we catch up.”

Source: China Daily